BIG SKY RESORT

BIG SKY – Women are kicking off Big Sky Resort’s ski season with a two-day Women’s Early Bird Clinic Dec. 6-7.

The Women’s Early Bird Clinic is taught by women and focuses on individual performance and mastering new techniques. Lead by Brenna Kelleher, PSIA instructor and former Montana State University NCAA ski racer, this specific clinic is a building block to advancing a woman’s skiing and allowing her to gain confidence on snow. The program is geared toward women already skiing at an intermediate level.

The resort is hosting Military Appreciation Weekend, Dec. 12-14, to thank our armed forces for their service to our country. Active duty or retired military men and women ski or snowboard for free with valid military identification and their immediate families receive $41 lift tickets on Saturday and Sunday. Military lodging specials are also available Friday and Saturday nights.

“The fact that the resort recognizes the sacrifices these people have made –being away from family and Montana – is great,” said Dick Fast, retired Air Force colonel and ski instructor at Big Sky Resort.

Active duty and retired military members and their immediate families will also receive discounts on lessons, activities and equipment rentals with military identification.

“We feel it’s essential for military families to enjoy the outdoors together, and what better way than skiing?” said Sheila Chapman, Big Sky Resort public relations manager and daughter of retired Air Force Major Craig Chapman.

On Dec. 12, Big Sky Resort will also host the 8th annual Turkey for a Ticket fundraiser at the Madison Base Area starting at 8:30 a.m. for the Gallatin Valley, Madison Valley and Big Sky food banks. This event encourages people to give to local food banks by thanking them with a free day of skiing.

Participants receive a free lift ticket valid for the day of the event in exchange for a minimum donation of a 13-pound frozen turkey or 20 cans of nonperishable food. The food banks are looking for the following specific canned items: fruit, tuna, chili, tomato sauce and soups.

Since the inaugural Turkey for a Ticket in 2007, the event has collected a cumulative total of 188,788 pounds of food for area food banks. As the holidays approach, the need for food donations increases.

“We continue to see nearly 3,000 individuals a month and the Turkey for a Ticket food drive helps us meet the ongoing need,” said Jill Holder, Gallatin Valley Food Bank operations manager. “We are grateful for such a giving community.”