Pair serves up Texas, Argentinian inspired BBQ

By Taylor Anderson, Big Sky Weekly Assistant Editor

This ain’t Allgood’s anymore, kid.

Big Sky’s only Houston-inspired, pecan wood smoking, meat lover’s paradise has come at the hands of a former Texan and a long-time local with Argentinian roots.

Seven-year resident Anderson Wallace and 17-year resident Martin Spagat hooked a custom-made steel Texas meat smoker to the back of a Uhaul piled with five cords of Pecan, Oak and Mesquite wood, and drove the 1,750-mile trip from the Gulf of Mexico to Big Sky.

The 30-somethings last year bought what was once Allgood’s bar in Big Sky after the former owner decided to close shop. (Spagat had worked for Dick Allgood for 10 years previously).

What they’ve done—aside from adding a second floor with pool tables, foosball, dart board and flat screens—is bring a menu to town that blends Texas with straight Montana beef, pork and chicken to create a tear-jerking Big Sky blend ranging from brisket to pulled pork and baby back ribs.

The menu, featuring the aforementioned meats, accompanies a hearty bourbon-baked bean dish to match the homegrown taste and feel of the entrees. The cole slaw’s not half bad either. The wings come smothered in house-made sauces ranging from Korean BBQ to honey Sriracha (highly recommended).

The place is clearly geared toward carnivores, but those watching their weight, arteries or performing vegetarian duty should ask for a salad or veggie burger: They’re not dainty, either.

It’s been a good season so far, but it wasn’t easy from the get-go. The two had to revamp the vibe from the old bar, a project more mogul than anthill. They also had construction work and had to do a bit of soul-searching before they could open up.

“There was a point where we thought we were gonna lock the door and walk away,” Wallace said.

Now, as the Broken Spoke nears its first year anniversary (they’re planning a party on April 20 to mark the day the two decided to buy the watering hole and grill), they’re finding troubled roads behind them, but some obstacles still ahead.

If they’re still alive and kicking after spring, they know they’ve made it.

“If we can make it through the next off-season, it’ll be smooth sailing,” Wallace said, straight-faced and somber. “We’ve just gotta be prepared for whatever’s coming.”

Though he knows it could be a rocky one through spring, Wallace trusts the local following they’ve gathered, and has faith that the community will back them through the slower times.

He says the Spoke is going to start serving up hearty breakfasts—think homegrown Texas mixed up with the roots of Spagat’s Argentinian grandmother.

“People were coming by before we were even open,” Wallace said. “It’s felt like a community thing” since the beginning.