The Montana Department of Environmental
Quality has issued a decision
for the Bozeman Solvent Site, a
state Superfund facility.

The decision provides a “framework
for the cleanup that will protect
public health and the environment,”
according to DEQ Director Richard
Opper. “The DEQ anticipates the
liable parties will move forward… in a
spirit of cooperation.”

The selected remedy uses a combination
of technologies to reduce
concentrations of tetrachloroethene
(PCE) and other hazardous chemicals
that have contaminated soil and
groundwater at the site. Enhanced
bioremediation, an injection process
that encourages microorganisms to
break down pollution, will clean up
the historic source area and accelerate
cleanup of contaminated groundwater.

The process will also rely on monitored
natural attenuation to address
the dissolved plume of contamination
in groundwater. Soil vapor extraction,
an engineered system to remove
contaminated fumes from soil, will
be used beneath the former Buttrey’s
Shopping Center.

The remedy also requires land use
restrictions, a permit to protect
construction workers in the area, and
continuation of the existing controlled
groundwater area.

The cost is estimated at $5.8 million.
Remedial design should take about
a year and cleanup about 10 years.
Long term monitoring will continue
for 25 years.

The site is located south of West
Main Street and east of North 19th
Avenue, and extends north of the
East Gallatin River. PCE is commonly
known as dry cleaning fluid and was
used at a dry cleaning business in the
shopping center. The chemical leaked
into the ground through an old sewer
line and septic system.

The DEQ considered public comment
before selecting this final
remedy.

– from the DEQ