By Mark Wehrman EBS Contributor

The golf industry is constantly changing. The one thing golfers can always count on is newer, advanced technology in equipment being introduced regularly. Every year, golf manufacturers make clubs easier to hit by spending millions of dollars on research and development. 

Sweet spots are getting larger, which is making the clubs more forgiving during off-center hits. Clubheads are getting bigger, providing more visual confidence and clubs are getting lighter, helping to increase clubhead speed, which equates to more distance. Hybrids, which feature a lower center of gravity, take the place of those hard-to-hit long irons and make it easier to launch the ball in the air. As consumers, we need to use this technology to our advantage.

One of the most common questions I hear when teaching golf is, “How do I hit it farther?” Although I’m a firm believer that you can’t buy a good golf game, I truly believe that you can buy distance. If you have a club in your golf bag that is more than six years old you are robbing yourself of more yardage. 

With the advancements in technology taking place each year, any golf equipment that’s seven years old or more is usually lacking the science needed to get the most out of your shot. For example, if you have a 10-year-old driver, you could probably pick up 5 additional yards on your drives by simply buying a new driver, without having to change your swing at all. The new club you purchase will be lighter, increasing your clubhead speed, it will have a larger sweet spot making off-center hits fly straighter, and it will have a bigger clubhead giving you more confidence. 

These technology advancements don’t just include clubs, it pertains to almost everything golf. Clothing now comes with SPF protection built into the material for sun protection. Golf shoes are still providing traction without sacrificing comfort. Golf club grips are not just designed to keep your hands from slipping, but also to help dampen the vibration felt through your arms. Shirts and hats are designed to be breathable and wick the moisture away from your body, making you less susceptible to the effects of heat and dehydration. 

I could go on forever, but the point is that if you want to hit the ball farther and not be miserable wearing golf clothes on a hot day, you might want to think about investing some money in your equipment and wardrobe—the residual effect will be long lasting.

Mark Wehrman is the PGA Head Professional at the Big Sky Resort Golf Course.