Inaugural LPHS Interact members inducted

By Joseph T. O’Connor Explore Big Sky Managing Editor

BIG SKY – Rotary International’s Big Sky chapter on March 12 formally inducted Lone Peak High School’s first Interact Club in the Warren Miller Performing Arts Center.

Interact Club, a worldwide subgroup of Rotary International, offers members ages 12-18 the opportunity to address issues in their respective communities, while cultivating leadership skills and connecting with community leaders.

LPHS Superintendent Jerry House welcomed parents and community members in attendance for the ceremony, then introduced Big Sky Rotarian Kathy Bouchard, Big Sky Rotary president-elect Danielle Miller, and Past District Governor Daryl Hanson.

Bouchard introduced 16 of 21 new Interact members who were present. Each approached the podium to accept an official pin, certificate, name badge, and wallet-sized card – the same cards that Rotarians carry – authorizing them as Interact members.

“The pins they received recognize that [they] would accept the four-way promise,” said House, referring to Rotary International’s official mantra that each member recites.

The Four-way Test has been a maxim for Rotarians since 1932 when international director Herbert J. Taylor wrote down, “the first 24 words” that came to him when he was trying to save his company from bankruptcy. Rotary International adopted the adage in the 1940s. It reads:

“Is it fair? Is it fair to all concerned? Will it build goodwill and better friendships? Will it be beneficial to all concerned?”

Following introductions, the LPHS Interact members recited the Four-way Test in their own words, as song.

After addressing the crowd, Interact President Bianca Godoy took questions and explained the importance of her involvement in the group.

“Sometimes it’s a lot of pressure, but it’s definitely service above self and giving back to society,” said the LPHS sophomore. “We decided we needed to give back to the community somehow, because they give us so much.”

Interact takes on projects to give back, ranging from local, national and international causes, House said, and could include assisting Blue Water Task Force, the Special Olympics, or helping eradicate polio worldwide. House, Bouchard and Miller are working with Big Sky Rotarians to help students set project subjects and timelines.

“We’re required as a club to meet twice a month,” House said. “What I’m super proud about [is that] some of the kids haven’t been in leadership spots before. They’re such a great group of diverse kids, and they want to help.”