NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY

WASHINGTON D.C. – Bozeman adventurer-conservationist Gregg Treinish is among an elite group of 17 visionary young trailblazers from around the world selected as the 2013 National Geographic Emerging Explorers.

Treinish founded the nonprofit Adventurers and Scientists for Conservation, which connects outdoor adventurers with research scientists who need help getting expensive, time-consuming, hard-to-reach information. More than 100 scientific organizations and 1,000 adventurers have participated.

A biologist with a B.A. from Montana State University, Treinish also organizes his own expeditions, contributing to research on wildlife-human interaction, fragmented habitats and threatened species. On a recent trip to Mongolia, he led a team surveying the wildlife, gathering data on wolverines and 20 other species. Treinish was a 2008 National Geographic Adventurer of the Year.

“As National Geographic celebrates its 125th anniversary year and looks forward to embracing a new age of exploration, we look to our Emerging Explorers to be leaders in pushing the boundaries of discovery and innovation,” said Terry Garcia, National Geographic’s executive vice president for Mission Programs. “They represent tomorrow’s Robert Ballards, Jacques Cousteaus and Jane Goodalls.”

Each selected candidate receives a $10,000 award to assist with research and to aid further exploration.

The Emerging Explorers program recognizes and supports gifted and inspiring adventurers, scientists and innovators at the forefront of discovery, adventure and global problem solving still early in their careers. It is part of the Society’s Explorer Programs, which also include Explorers-in-Residence and National Geographic Fellows.