YELLOWSTONE FOREVER

Yellowstone Forever and Nature’s Best Photography magazine have announced the winners of a competition documenting and celebrating the world’s first national park through photography and public participation.

The second annual Yellowstone Forever Photo Contest was comprised of three divisions—professional, amateur and youth—and entrants submitted their best wildlife and landscape images of Yellowstone. A judging panel comprised of experts in photography, publishing, education and conservation selected the winners based on technical quality, originality, artistic merit and overall appeal.

Below are a few of the top 100 images from the contest with details about how they were made.

LANDSCAPES FIRST PLACE: AMATEUR. “The timing was key, resulting in this image where you may also see coyote foot prints leading to and from the snow circle,” said photographer Tim Auer of Mountain View, California. Depicted is Sawmill Geyser at sunset in the Upper Geyser Basin.

LANDSCAPES FIRST PLACE: AMATEUR. “The timing was key, resulting in this image where you may also see coyote foot prints leading to and from the snow circle,” said photographer Tim Auer of Mountain View, California. Depicted is Sawmill Geyser at sunset in the Upper Geyser Basin.


WILDLIFE THIRD PLACE: AMATEUR John Winnie Jr. of Bozeman said it took more than 300 attempts to get this image of a spawning Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout. It was taken at Trout Lake.

WILDLIFE THIRD PLACE: AMATEUR John Winnie Jr. of Bozeman said it took more than 300 attempts to get this image of a spawning Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout. It was taken at Trout Lake.


LANDSCAPES HIGHLY HONORED: PROFESSIONAL Garret Surie of Los Angeles, California, climbed a bluff overlooking Grand Prismatic Spring to capture this image. “At sunrise, I witnessed a 22 degree halo, a phenomenon in which light refracted in suspended ice particles creates a ring around the sun,” he said.

LANDSCAPES HIGHLY HONORED: PROFESSIONAL Garret Surie of Los Angeles, California, climbed a bluff overlooking Grand Prismatic Spring to capture this image. “At sunrise, I witnessed a 22 degree halo, a phenomenon in which light refracted in suspended ice particles creates a ring around the sun,” he said.


WILDLIFE HONORABLE MENTION: AMATEUR Greig Huggins of Sandy, Utah, took this image of a fox with a muskrat above LeHardy Rapids on a late October day. “This was one of my most magical and memorable days in Yellowstone Park!” he said.

WILDLIFE HONORABLE MENTION: AMATEUR Greig Huggins of Sandy, Utah, took this image of a fox with a muskrat above LeHardy Rapids on a late October day. “This was one of my most magical and memorable days in Yellowstone Park!” he said.


WILDLIFE HONORABLE MENTION: AMATEUR Nancy McKenzie of Martin, Tennessee, took this image at Grand Prismatic Spring. She reached the spring on a foggy and chilly September morning and found four bison trotting around. “They stood still for about 30 seconds, then abruptly turned and went back the way they came,” she said.

WILDLIFE HONORABLE MENTION: AMATEUR Nancy McKenzie of Martin, Tennessee, took this image at Grand Prismatic Spring. She reached the spring on a foggy and chilly September morning and found four bison trotting around. “They stood still for about 30 seconds, then abruptly turned and went back the way they came,” she said.