EBS STAFF

From June 7-10, the BZN International Film Festival will showcase more than 60 films from around the world—eight from Montana—that champion women’s voices and environmental activism. The festival will screen films at nearly a dozen Bozeman venues that include Montana State University, the Museum of the Rockies, the Rialto, the Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture, the Ellen Theatre and the Willson Auditorium.

Opening night of the BZN International Film Festival will take place June 7 at the Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture with a 7:30 p.m. screening of James Redford’s “Happening: A Clean Energy Revolution” in the Crawford Theater.

A nod to the sustainability efforts of the theater’s benefactors Tim and Kathy Crawford, “Happening” explores the developments and future of clean energy in America. As he crosses the country promoting solar power, Redford speaks with business and political leaders, scientists, and advocates for clean energy including actor Mark Ruffalo; Nevada senator Patricia Spearman; and Lisa Jackson, vice president of environmental policy at Apple.

The film has screened at DOC NYC, Mill Valley Film Festival, and the American Film Showcase, among others. A pre-event reception for Gallatin and Hyalite passholders will begin in the Emerson Ballroom at 5:30 pm.

Other standout films include “Rainy Mountain,” based on the life of Pulitzer Prize-winning author N. Scott Momaday, and “Mankiller,” the story of the Cherokee Nation’s first woman principal chief, both set in Montana or the broader American West. One panel discussion will explore the nuances of filming in Montana.

Ken Burns’ “Not for Ourselves Alone,” the story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, will screen at the MSU’s Procrastinator Theater on June 8. A pass is not necessary to attend this Emmy Award-winning documentary or “The Long Shadow,” in which filmmaker Frances Causey investigates the roots of racism.

Also on the docket are two films from Venezuela: “They Call us Warriors,” about the Venezuelan women’s football team overcoming gender discrimination for a chance to win the first World Cup for their country; and “Ivana,” a film noir-style story about a female assassin in a corrupt and morally ambiguous society.

In an effort to encourage discourse, organizers anticipate the attendance of 30 filmmakers that will host panel discussions throughout the multi-day event. The panel conversations will examine topics that relate to the films presented, such as sexuality and gender identity, familial relationships, and local and global worldwide environmental efforts. A spotlight will also be cast on Bozeman’s community of female entrepreneurs.

Visit bozemanfilmcelebration.com for tickets and the full lineup of films.