Extreme ski pioneers launch into hall of fame

EBS Staff

A pair of legends is leaving tracks in the powder of ski lore. Ski pioneers Dan and John Egan will be inducted into the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame and Museum in April 2017 as part of the class of 2016.

First known as world-renowned extreme skiers, the Egans are now considered pioneers of action sports, and have starred in more Warren Miller ski films than any other skiers in the world.
 
Miller, a ski-movie pioneer in his own right, referred to them as “the ATVs” of ski films. Their famed three-story cornice break at Grand Targhee, Wyoming, was captured in Miller’s 1990 film “Extreme Winter,” and is the most viewed film segment of all time. 

Egan and John were known for skiing the most remote regions of the world and their exploits have been featured on the Discovery Channel, ESPN and Good Morning America. Powder Magazine named them two of the most influential skiers of our time.
  
The Egans were pivotal in the growth of the action sports and played a critical role in moving the word “extreme” from the mountains to NYC’s Madison and Fifth avenues. Their exploits chronicled the geopolitical landscape of the late ‘80s and ‘90s.

The Egan brothers will be officially inducted into the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Hall of Fame during Snowsport History Week in Stowe, Vermont from April 4-9, 2017.

Kenney named new Yellowstone deputy superintendent 

  
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Dan Wenk announced on Nov. 17 that Patrick (Pat) Kenney has been selected as the park’s new deputy superintendent. Kenney will replace Steve Iobst, who retired in September.

“[Kenney] comes to us with extensive operational experience, project management skills, and the ability to build relationships both inside and outside the organization,” Wenk said.   

Kenney, a 26-year veteran of the National Park Service, currently serves as the superintendent of Cape Lookout National Seashore in North Carolina. In this role since 2011, he handled issues including major facility improvements, a new concessions contract for a passenger ferry service, and storm recovery efforts, among others.

“I am thrilled to become the deputy superintendent at Yellowstone, the world’s first national park,” Kenney said. “While I’m sorry to leave my staff, colleagues, and partners at Cape Lookout, I am ready for this challenge and am honored to serve on Yellowstone’s management team.”

Prior to managing Cape Lookout, Kenney served as the planning branch chief at the Denver Service Center, which is the central planning, design, and construction management project office for the National Park Service. At DSC, Kenney managed numerous planning efforts in a variety of parks including Mount Rainier, Everglades, Big Cypress, and Badlands. 

Mr. Kenney began his NPS career as a resource management specialist at Big Cypress National Preserve in 1990.

Comments sought for Middle Fork Sixteen Mile Road relocation

U.S. FOREST SERVICE

The Custer Gallatin National Forest is seeking input on a proposed relocation of a short section of Forest Service Road No. 642, the Middle Fork of Sixteen Mile Road. This road is located in the Bridger Mountains near Flathead Pass and the relocation would move it from private to national forest land.

The relocation would cover approximately ¼ to 1/3 of a mile and resolve a disputed easement on private land.

“We believe the relocation would create a more sustainable road in an upland location that reduces erosion and maintenance costs and allows for better public access to national forest system lands,” said Lisa Stoeffler, Bozeman District Ranger. “The current road has a steep section on poor soils and is very close to the creek, causing sediment concerns.”

Much of the public use on this road occurs during hunting season and involves horse trailers. Incidents where vehicles have become stuck or slid off the road into the ditch have been reported. 

Although the Forest Service believes the public has rights to travel the existing road, relocating it would prevent any future disputes with a landowner and ensure uninterrupted public use. 
 
The Environmental Assessment is available by contacting the Bozeman Ranger District at (406) 522-2520 or on the Custer Gallatin National Forest’s website at fs.usda.gov/custergallatin

Public comment may be submitted electronically to FS-comments-northern-gallatin@fs.fed.us. Use the name of the project, Sixteen Mile Road Relocation, as the subject line of your email.
 

Park City patrol ratifies contract with Vail Resorts

COMMUNICATIONS WORKERS OF AMERICA

Almost one year after voting to organize as a union, the Park City Professional Ski Patrol Association announced Nov. 15 the ratification of its first contract with Vail Resorts.

The two-year agreement was passed by a two-to-one margin on Monday night. The membership consists of patrollers from the former Park City Mountain Resort and Canyons Resort, and the newly created Mountain Safety patrol, which now operates as a single department at the Vail Resorts-managed Park City Resort.

Highlights of the agreement include expanded educational and professional development opportunities; a strengthened avalanche dog program; a joint patrol/management safety committee to address safety issues; a grievance and expedited arbitration procedure to work out disputes; and just cause in disciplinary actions.

“Anytime two groups with separate histories and cultures are combined, there are bound to be some growing pains,” said Julia Edwards, a ski patroller on the union’s negotiating committee. “This contract helps unite us with common benefits and work rules.”

The negotiating committee was comprised of members representing patrollers at both the Park City and Canyons Village base areas and Mountain Safety. The contract will cover about 200 employees through the end of the 2017-2018 ski season.

CWA is committed to improving the working conditions of ski patrollers, who statistically have one of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. and Canada.