THE EMERSON CENTER FOR THE ARTS & CULTURE

Three new exhibitions featuring four Montana artists open at The Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture on Friday, May 12 with a reception from 5 to 8 p.m. The work of Danielle O’Malley, Steve Osman, and a collaboration between Meghan Purcell and Lauren Lipscomb will be showcased for nearly two months in the center’s various galleries.

Through July 7, the Jessie Wilber Gallery will house “Efflorescence,” an exhibit featuring the ceramics of Danielle O’Malley. O’Malley’s work reflects her interests in the natural world and morphology. She is drawn to horticultural imagery and the alluring qualities of a plant’s unusual shapes and mutations. Her work combines movement, fragility, fluidity and tactile qualities into a single, convincing form. Since graduating with her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, O’Malley has traveled the globe as a resident artist, teaching assistant and demonstrator. She currently lives and works as a professional artist in Bozeman.

Oil paintings by Steve Osman will occupy the lobby gallery. Osman’s exhibit, “Ancient Lifeforms,” will also run through July 7. Osman is a self-taught artist and Bozeman resident for 17 years. A degree in environmental biology and the 11 years he lived in Costa Rica cultivated a deep interest and appreciation for nature. This series explores two of the oldest life forms on earth—lichen and sandhill cranes. Both species have contributed to Osman’s exploration and development of his unique artistic style. Lichen has given him the opportunity to work with bold, impressionistic shapes; while capturing the beauty of cranes fostered both representative and impressionistic styles.

Felted wool hangings by Meghan Purcell are part of a new exhibit and artistic collaboration between the fiber artist and photographer Lauren Lipscomb that explores the fate of the Montana sheep ranchers. PHOTO BY LAUREN LIPSCOMB

The Weaver Room gallery hosts “Behind the Wool: Honoring the Integrity of Montana Sheep Ranchers,” featuring fiber art by Meghan Purcell and the photography of Lauren Lipscomb through June 30. The joint work of Purcell and Lipscomb is cultivated through the ideals of sustainable and intentional practices. Shaped from a collective vision, “Behind the Wool” is an artistic investigation into the challenges Montana sheep farmers face in present times. With cooperation from six local farmers, this vision developed into an opportunity to understand their personal efforts to combat these struggles, and the adaptations required to preserve and sustain Montana sheep ranching.
The opening reception on May 12 is in conjunction with the Emerson’s annual open house and celebration of the organization’s 24th birthday. Visit theemerson.org for more information.